Elias Conference, Leicester: Last Call

The deadline for abstracts for the next major Elias Conference, to be held in Leicester in June 2014, is just over one week away. Please submit your abstract by 31st December 2013.

We have already received many excellent submissions from scholars from a range of disciplines, and from across several continents. This promises to be a major event. Again, we would like to stress the openness of the event, and invite submissions from any with an interest in the areas covered by the conference.

Please note, the information below has been updated to include details of plenary and keynote speakers who have now accepted our invitation to address the conference.

From the Past to the Present and towards Possible Futures: The Collected Works of Norbert Elias

College Court, University of Leicester, 20th–22nd June 2014

Call for Papers

‘One cannot ignore the fact that every present society has grown out of earlier societies and points beyond itself to a diversity of possible futures.’ 

‘Today we have basically lost the ability to think of a future. Most people do not want to go beyond their present – they do not like to see themselves as a link in the chain of generations’ – Norbert Elias, 1987

In 2014 the eighteenth and final volume of the Collected Works of Norbert Elias in English will be published by University College Dublin Press.

The mammoth undertaking, in association with the Norbert Elias Foundation, Amsterdam, and under the stewardship of Professor Stephen Mennell, has taken a decade to bring to fruition. It brings together the entire corpus of Elias’s works, featuring many writings previously unpublished or not hitherto translated into English, faithfully representing his core ideas and his overall sociological position.

The conference marking the completion of the whole project will appropriately be held at the University of Leicester, where Elias lived and taught from 1954 to 1977. It both honours Elias’s association with the University of Leicester, and recognises the widespread, international and interdisciplinary interest in his work, and its resurgence within the University and more generally within the human sciences.

Craig Calhoun, Director of the London School of Economics, has agreed to give the opening address (Friday 20th). A further keynote address on  will be provided by Abram de Swaan (Saturday 21st). Further invited plenary sessions will also be provided by: Behrouz Alikhani, Marc Joly,  Marta Bucholc and Bo Paulle.

The conference is organised around some of Elias’s key works: On the Process of CivilisationWhat is Sociology?The Established and the OutsidersQuest for Excitement; and Essays I: On the Sociology of Knowledge and the Sciences.

Despite its focus on the Collected Works of Elias, the spirit of this event is one of openness to, and dialogue with, competing sociological positions. It will pose questions including:

·         How might Elias’s work be employed to address some of the challenges of the human sciences in the twenty-first century?

·         Elias was not a sociologist in the narrow sense: he aimed at a grand sociological, historical, psychological synthesis. Did he succeed?

·         To what extent does Elias’s work provide a means of redressing the fragmentation of the human sciences and, especially, reintegrating sociologists who have intellectually migrated to different, increasingly diverse, specialisms and sub-disciplines?

·         Is Elias’s critique of sociologists’ ‘retreat into the present’ still valid today? What role might Elias’s work have in the more general ‘relational turn’ that has become a major topic of discussion in recent years?

·         Is it possible to reconcile Elias’s ‘figurational’ sociological practice – marked by its emphasis on long-term processes and its caution regarding the intrusion of ‘heteronomous values’ – with the institutional demands for short-term ‘impact’, ‘accountability’, and the increasing emphasis on the short-term practical and monetary value of social scientific research for specific ‘user groups’?

·         Can Elias’s approach be squared with recent calls for a more ‘public’ sociology, and indeed, more explicitly politically-involved and directed ‘partisan’ scholarship’?

In addition to a series of postgraduate workshops and keynote presentations on these and related central concerns, the conference will feature five parallel streams organised according to Elias’s key works as follows:

On the Process of Civilisation

Civilising processes, decivilising processes, ‘dyscivilising’ processes and debates about processual ‘directions’

Violence, war, terror and international relations in long-term developmental perspective

Sociogenetic and psychogenetic relationships

Critiques, revisions and extensions to Elias’s magnum opus

(Contributors may also wish to refer to related works, such as The Court SocietyHumana Conditio and Essays II: On Civilising Processes, State Formation and National Identity)

What is Sociology?

Power, figurations, interdependence, and theoretical debates about them

Sociogenesis of sociology and the concept of ‘society’

Game models and relational thinking

Structure/agency and the society of individuals

(Contributors may also wish to refer to related works, such as The Society of Individuals and Essays III: On Sociology and the Humanities)

Essays I: The Sociology of Knowledge and the Sciences

Knowledge and scientific establishments

The politics of figurational sociology

Problems of method and methodology

Unplanned long-term processes versus planning and policy

Prospects for a grand synthesis of history, psychology and the social sciences

Elias’s sociological practice

(Contributors may also wish to refer to related works, such as Involvement and Detachment and The Symbol Theory)

Quest for Excitement

Sport, social bonding and violence

Mimetic and leisure activities

Work, leisure and consumption

Gender, power and identities in the spare time spectrum

The Established and the Outsiders

Community studies and community relations

Blame and praise gossip in the formation of communities

Developments in established–outsider relations theory

Ethnicity, migration and locality

Abstracts of no more than 500 words for the conference should be submitted to the conference organisers, John Goodwin (jdg3@leicester.ac.uk) and Jason Hughes (jason.hughes@le.ac.uk) not later than 31 December, 2013.

Abstracts must:

·         Specifically address one or more of the conference themes (and specify preferred stream)

·         Include details of institutional affiliation

·         Be written in English, since all presentations will be in English

Abstracts received after the closing date will not be considered. Registration for the conference will open 3 February 2014.

Further information about the Collected Works of Norbert Elias

Besides containing many texts never before published in English, or not published at all, the Collected Works contain new editions, extensively amended, annotated and cross-referenced. Intending contributors to the conference are recommended to consult the new editions.

1        Early Writings

2        The Court Society

3        On the Process of Civilisation

4        The Established and the Outsiders (with John L. Scotson)

5        What is Sociology?

6        The Loneliness of the Dying and Humana Conditio

7        Quest for Excitement: Sport and Leisure in the Civilising Process (with Eric Dunning)

8        Involvement and Detachment

9        An Essay on Time

10      The Society of Individuals

11      Studies on the Germans

12      Mozart and Other Essays on Courtly Art

13      The Symbol Theory

14      Essays I: On the Sociology of Knowledge and the Sciences

15      Essays II: On Civilising Processes, State Formation and National Identity

16      Essays III: On Sociology and the Humanities

17      Interviews and Autobiographical Reflections (Autumn, 2013)

18      Supplements and Index to the Collected Works (Spring 2014)

For further information, see the UCD Press website: www.ucdpress.ie

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Emotion, Habitus and World War I – New Book by Helmut Kuzmics and Sabine Haring

This is to announce the publication of a much anticipated volume by Helmut Kuzmics and Sabine Haring: Emotion, Habitus und Erster Weltkrieg. Soziologische Studien zum militärischen Untergang der Habsburger Monarchie. (Emotion, Habitus and the First World War: Sociological Studies of the Military Fall of the Hapsburg Monarchy).  V & R unipress: Göttingen 2013, 607 pages, 69.99 Euro (Germany). Full details are available here: Kuzmics

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New PhD Studentship Opportunities at the University of Leicester

The University of Leicester has recently been successful in its application to the AHRC as part of a consortium of three midlands universities (Nottingham, Leicester and Birmingham) for a number of fully funded PhD studentships. The Midlands3Cities Doctoral Training Partnership has a focus on areas of research in arts, but, following a discussing between the Heads of Arts and Social Sciences at Leicester, the programme has also been extended to Social Sciences, including Sociology. Given the AHRC umbrella, topics will need to have some link to the areas of culture/history, etc. and will need to be pitched as such. Developmental studies of culture, or more general figurational analyses with a focus of, say, literature, art, film, music, etc. would thus make for an ideal fit with the thematic priorities of the programme.

The Partnership has secured a generous quota of fully funded PhD Studentships for each of the three Universities involved paid in part by the AHRC. There are three stages to the process of application:

1. An application to the Department via the normal mode of application:

http://www2.le.ac.uk/study/research/how-to-apply

2. An application by January 9th together with the prospective supervisor to the Midlands3Cities programme website:

http://www.midlands3cities.ac.uk/midlands-3-cities/funding.aspx

3. Academic references (from applicant-appointed referees) by 14th January.

Deadlines are strict, which means that time is tight for prospective applications. For full details of the programme, see here. Informal discussions and expressions of interest should be sent to Jason Hughes.

In looking at the Partnership Programme outline, I was minded of a conference stream at Graz earlier this year in which a series of papers were presented on the topic of Elias and Popular Culture. These kinds of areas, once again, would be ideal for this particular PhD Studentship Programme. Below, as a reminder, is an outline of some of the topics considered in that stream:

Norbert Elias is well known for his study of long-term ‘civilising processes’. He had a robust intellectual rationale for using ‘civilisation’ rather than ‘culture’ as the primary focus for his work. As he discusses in the opening to his magnum opus, On the Process of Civilisation, the term ‘Kultur’, particularly in its German usage, has retained certain connotations from its specific path of development, stressing introspection, difference, uniqueness. ‘Civilisation’, on the other hand, has conceptual value because of its emphasis on development: for its application as a term which invites comparison, contrast, and which is always attuned to long-term processes of ‘becoming’. Arguably, despite its normative baggage as a watchword for Western superiority, the concept of civilisation remains analytically useful because it does not separate cultural processes from social processes, and encompasses much that is normally considered in relation to studies and analyses of ‘culture’. This presents a series of enduring problems: what is the evidential status of ‘cultural artefacts’ when viewed as historical data? Might popular culture constitute a vehicle for shifting standards of socially acceptable behaviour? Where do studies of popular culture stand in relation to analyses of civilising processes? How might a contemporary researcher locate research into film, television, and new media, in the context of longer-term processes of social development? How might one reconcile Elias’s work with ‘media studies’ and other analyses of popular culture?

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Thomas Scheff: The Repression of Shame

Below is a link that Thomas Scheff has asked to be posted on the Elias blog. Tom plans to present the paper at the Elias Collected Works conference in June 2014.
The abstract is as follows:

This essay proposes that there is a taboo on shame in modern societies that interferes with the objective study of this emotion. The taboo is based on repression, the hiding of information at first from others, then from self. My own difficulty in recognizing shame as a field of study is described. Some examples of studies that seem unaware that their topic is shame (under an alternative name) are discussed.

Thomas Sheff, Shame

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Special edition of Human Figurations journal

Special Journal Edition of Human Figurations,’ Everyday practices and long term-processes: Overcoming dichotomies with the work of Norbert Elias’, is now online. http://quod.lib.umich.edu/h/humfig/11217607.0002.3*?rgn=full+text

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Deadline Fast Approaching: Elias Collected Works Conference, Leicester, June 2014

The deadline for the next major Elias Conference, to be held in Leicester in June 2014, is fast approaching. Please submit your abstract by 31st December 2013.

We have already had a good number of excellent submissions from scholars from a range of disciplines, and from across several continents. This promises to be a major event. Again, we would like to stress the openness of the event, and invite submissions from any with an interest in the areas covered by the conference.

Please note, the information below has been updated to include details of plenary and keynote speakers who have now accepted our invitation to address the conference.

From the Past to the Present and towards Possible Futures: The Collected Works of Norbert Elias

College Court, University of Leicester, 20th–22nd June 2014

Call for Papers

‘One cannot ignore the fact that every present society has grown out of earlier societies and points beyond itself to a diversity of possible futures.’ 

‘Today we have basically lost the ability to think of a future. Most people do not want to go beyond their present – they do not like to see themselves as a link in the chain of generations’ – Norbert Elias, 1987

In 2014 the eighteenth and final volume of the Collected Works of Norbert Elias in English will be published by University College Dublin Press.

The mammoth undertaking, in association with the Norbert Elias Foundation, Amsterdam, and under the stewardship of Professor Stephen Mennell, has taken a decade to bring to fruition. It brings together the entire corpus of Elias’s works, featuring many writings previously unpublished or not hitherto translated into English, faithfully representing his core ideas and his overall sociological position.

The conference marking the completion of the whole project will appropriately be held at the University of Leicester, where Elias lived and taught from 1954 to 1977. It both honours Elias’s association with the University of Leicester, and recognises the widespread, international and interdisciplinary interest in his work, and its resurgence within the University and more generally within the human sciences.

Craig Calhoun, Director of the London School of Economics, has agreed to give the opening address (Friday 20th). A further keynote address on  will be provided by Abram de Swaan (Saturday 21st). Further invited plenary sessions will also be provided by: Behrouz Alikhani, Marc Joly, and Marta Bucholc.

The conference is organised around some of Elias’s key works: On the Process of CivilisationWhat is Sociology?The Established and the OutsidersQuest for Excitement; and Essays I: On the Sociology of Knowledge and the Sciences.

Despite its focus on the Collected Works of Elias, the spirit of this event is one of openness to, and dialogue with, competing sociological positions. It will pose questions including:

·         How might Elias’s work be employed to address some of the challenges of the human sciences in the twenty-first century?

·         Elias was not a sociologist in the narrow sense: he aimed at a grand sociological, historical, psychological synthesis. Did he succeed?

·         To what extent does Elias’s work provide a means of redressing the fragmentation of the human sciences and, especially, reintegrating sociologists who have intellectually migrated to different, increasingly diverse, specialisms and sub-disciplines?

·         Is Elias’s critique of sociologists’ ‘retreat into the present’ still valid today? What role might Elias’s work have in the more general ‘relational turn’ that has become a major topic of discussion in recent years?

·         Is it possible to reconcile Elias’s ‘figurational’ sociological practice – marked by its emphasis on long-term processes and its caution regarding the intrusion of ‘heteronomous values’ – with the institutional demands for short-term ‘impact’, ‘accountability’, and the increasing emphasis on the short-term practical and monetary value of social scientific research for specific ‘user groups’?

·         Can Elias’s approach be squared with recent calls for a more ‘public’ sociology, and indeed, more explicitly politically-involved and directed ‘partisan’ scholarship’?

In addition to a series of postgraduate workshops and keynote presentations on these and related central concerns, the conference will feature five parallel streams organised according to Elias’s key works as follows:

On the Process of Civilisation

Civilising processes, decivilising processes, ‘dyscivilising’ processes and debates about processual ‘directions’

Violence, war, terror and international relations in long-term developmental perspective

Sociogenetic and psychogenetic relationships

Critiques, revisions and extensions to Elias’s magnum opus

(Contributors may also wish to refer to related works, such as The Court SocietyHumana Conditio and Essays II: On Civilising Processes, State Formation and National Identity)

What is Sociology?

Power, figurations, interdependence, and theoretical debates about them

Sociogenesis of sociology and the concept of ‘society’

Game models and relational thinking

Structure/agency and the society of individuals

(Contributors may also wish to refer to related works, such as The Society of Individuals and Essays III: On Sociology and the Humanities)

Essays I: The Sociology of Knowledge and the Sciences

Knowledge and scientific establishments

The politics of figurational sociology

Problems of method and methodology

Unplanned long-term processes versus planning and policy

Prospects for a grand synthesis of history, psychology and the social sciences

Elias’s sociological practice

(Contributors may also wish to refer to related works, such as Involvement and Detachment and The Symbol Theory)

Quest for Excitement

Sport, social bonding and violence

Mimetic and leisure activities

Work, leisure and consumption

Gender, power and identities in the spare time spectrum

The Established and the Outsiders

Community studies and community relations

Blame and praise gossip in the formation of communities

Developments in established–outsider relations theory

Ethnicity, migration and locality

Abstracts of no more than 500 words for the conference should be submitted to the conference organisers, John Goodwin (jdg3@leicester.ac.uk) and Jason Hughes (jason.hughes@le.ac.uk) not later than 31 December, 2013.

Abstracts must:

·         Specifically address one or more of the conference themes (and specify preferred stream)

·         Include details of institutional affiliation

·         Be written in English, since all presentations will be in English

Abstracts received after the closing date will not be considered. Registration for the conference will open 3 February 2014.

Further information about the Collected Works of Norbert Elias

Besides containing many texts never before published in English, or not published at all, the Collected Works contain new editions, extensively amended, annotated and cross-referenced. Intending contributors to the conference are recommended to consult the new editions.

1        Early Writings

2        The Court Society

3        On the Process of Civilisation

4        The Established and the Outsiders (with John L. Scotson)

5        What is Sociology?

6        The Loneliness of the Dying and Humana Conditio

7        Quest for Excitement: Sport and Leisure in the Civilising Process (with Eric Dunning)

8        Involvement and Detachment

9        An Essay on Time

10      The Society of Individuals

11      Studies on the Germans

12      Mozart and Other Essays on Courtly Art

13      The Symbol Theory

14      Essays I: On the Sociology of Knowledge and the Sciences

15      Essays II: On Civilising Processes, State Formation and National Identity

16      Essays III: On Sociology and the Humanities

17      Interviews and Autobiographical Reflections (Autumn, 2013)

18      Supplements and Index to the Collected Works (Spring 2014)

For further information, see the UCD Press website: www.ucdpress.ie

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Symposium in Honour of Professor Dr Hans-Peter Waldhoff. Hanover: 30th November-1st December

For as long as the history of modern science has been unfolding, including its parallel development with that of the humanities, there has been a critical counter-current running against dominant thinking styles and thought-collectives at work. Such a current frequently reflects a profound unease with a certain lifelessness in modern scientific thinking: a kind of death drive in thinking techniques that tend towards the destruction of synthesis. Thinkers such as Fichte, Goethe, Freud, Georges Devereux and other ethno-psychoanalytic knowledge theories are exemplars in respect of this unease, as are theorists as diverse from one another as Ludwik Fleck, C.W. Mills, Zygmunt Bauman and Wilfried Bion. Similarly, if one takes a closer look at Norbert Elias’s concept of involvement–detachment balances and his personal way of concept formation and synthesis-building, it is possible to discern the same critical current at work.

Hans-Peter Waldhoff has endeavoured throughout his work to demonstrate how thinking about civilizing processes involves the civilizing of our thinking techniques as well. This symposium for his 60th birthday at the University of Hanover features a range of speakers who each share a concern to treat their human objects as living subjects in their own right. Topics like learning processes; civilizing processes; migration and dealing with strangers; and de-civilizing movements of the extreme right; are considered by speakers from five countries and a range of disciplines, among them sociologists, psychologists, group-analysts and historians. The conference seeks to bring to the fore a concern with subject-object-relations, as scientists are invited to reflect on topics central to their lives.

Participation is free of charge. The Norbert-Elias-Foundation supports the symposium. Fuller details can be found in the flyer included here: Symposium Wo denken wir hin_-Flyer

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EU Horizons 2020:  Major new possibilities for research funding for process sociology

The EU has announced the outlines of a new funding programme (Horizon 2020) that will support collaborative research (onto which funding for doctoral students could be bolted) on various fields including what have been described as Societal Challenges. They are cross-EU research programmes that extend previous Framework Programmes. They will promote research collaboration on a multi-institution basis, involving at least three institutions.

One of the specific topics listed under Societal Challenges is of special interest to, and not least because of the explicit reference to the need to understand ‘the process of civilization in modern Europe’.  The EU’s description of the programme is as follows:

Topic 12. Individual reactions to the crisis and challenges to European solidarity

Specific Challenge

The crisis has put the Europeans under even more strain. Many commentators have observed that beyond the appearance of hyper-choice, our modern world dictates our behaviours and leaves people with little meaningful freedom, hence new types of pathologies. The combination of various “cultures” and “lifestyles” which enhance at the same time control on individuals and boundless self-realisation, the urgency to do well in a competitive environment together with the many frustrations of individualism, lead towards a deficit of symbolisation and the development of discontent.

In this context it is not surprising that the notion of solidarity comes back to the fore either between individuals or groups or even between people/nations/States. ‘Solidarity’ is one of the Union’s values mentioned in Article 2 of the Lisbon Treaty (TEU). It was originally closely associated with the notion of fraternity, and later on class struggle. Today it refers to a special social relationship which seems contingent on a shared political perspective. Showing solidarity is a political act. It connotes a preparedness to share resources with others.

However, how can the discontent be tackled and solidarity enhanced? This is a challenge that will require innovative thinking in political philosophy, clinical psychology and psychoanalysis, as well as sociology and law.

Scope

Research will explore the links between the meta-social frameworks and the meta-psychic frameworks in modern societies in Europe and the likely translation of these links at psychic level. It will thus explore the development of symbolisation and the “processes of civilisation” in modern Europe. It will cast light in particular on new psychopathologies in modern life and analyse whether and how the current crisis actually influences these pathologies. It should combine theoretical and empirical work in this endeavour. Research should also explore solidarity both as an intellectual concept and its more practical expressions. This requires a comprehensive reappraisal of the history of the concept, the evolution of its conceptualisation as well as the various guises of solidarity. It will assess and test the conditions of acts of solidarity by individuals generally and investigate to what extent the crisis has influenced citizens’ preparedness to show solidarity with others, in particular with those hit worst by the crisis, both within and between member States. It will explore the conditions necessary for solidarity to be successfully invoked to make a difference to European governance, and address how the relationship between solidarity, human rights and EU citizenship can be elucidated, what ‘responsibilities’ lie within solidarity as a principle and where are their limits, what kind of events or policies are specific loci for solidarity investigations which test the point at which solidarity exists or fails.

Expected Impact

Research is expected to expand and deepen the knowledge base both conceptually and empirically on the discontent expressed by individuals in modern societies. It should help to point to the cultural shifts that combine social and psychic transformations which would be necessary in order to address the deepest manifestations of crisis in Europe. Projects should also provide sophisticated historical and theoretical conceptualizations of solidarity, while simultaneously exposing the practical implications of its contemporary expressions. Research is expected to provide a critical assessment of what kind of policy responses have in the past jeopardised or even undermined European solidarity generally or negatively impacted upon individuals’ preparedness to show solidarity. Projects should develop a coherent vision of policy responses which are prone to instilling solidarity within the population. Research should also assess what kind of shared political perspective is required to facilitate solidarity and acts of solidarity within the EU.

Instrument: Collaborative projects (100%) – Single stage

As you can see, the description creates real opportunities for promoting process sociological investigations of the social and political change in Europe.  Some of the language that has been used in the description has a clear process sociological tone.  The reference to “processes of civilisation” in modern Europe almost demands a bid for research funding from the ‘figurational family’ – a bid that explores, inter alia, connections between process sociology, International Politics and European Studies, and might consider, amongst other things, Elias’s analysis of the civilizing process as well as specific reflections on ‘we-feeling’ and ‘the scope of emotional identification’, the significance of the ‘drag effect’ of nation-state loyalties and the role of ‘unions of states’ in the context of rising levels of human interconnectedness.  It is clear from the EU’s description of the research area that there is a strong interest in work that reflects on the ‘European project’ and the prospects for ‘solidarity’ given the social and political effects of the financial crisis.

The EU has announced that final decisions on Horizon 2020 will be made over the next two months, and that final decisions on proposals will be announced on 11 December 2013.  On the envisaged timetable final first year proposals will have to be submitted between May and August 2014.

My understanding is that research bids will be difficult to coordinate, organise and write, but that the rewards will be huge (around 2.5-3 million Euros may be allocated to each successful applications).

As far as the initial coordination is concerned, could anyone who is interested in the project, please contact Jason Hughes (jh528@leicester.ac.uk). It will be valuable to have expressions of interest in being part of such a bid, and to reflect on how to take the discussion forward.

Andrew Linklater

Department of International Politics

Aberystwyth University

UK

1.10.2013

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Two Full PhD Studentships at the Department of Sociology, University of Leicester

The Department of Sociology, University of Leicester has today announced two full studentships in Sociology. The studentships cover home/EU fees, but it would be possible for international students to apply (and to pay the difference between home and EU fees). The studentships also include an annual stipend of £13726, plus a research allowance of £750 per annum.

As subscribers to this blog will no doubt be aware, Leicester has a long-standing association with the work of Elias. An engagement with Elias’s work continues to this day, and the Department would particularly welcome applications from prospective PhD candidates who have an interest in exploring, applying, and extending the principles of process sociology. Please direct any informal queries to me at jason.hughes@le.ac.uk

The deadline for applications is tight, 31st October. The proposed start date is January 2014.

Further details and application forms are available on the University website, here:

http://www2.le.ac.uk/study/research/funding/sociology

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Jason Hughes becomes blog Administrator

Jason Hughes, Professor of Sociology at the University of Leicester, has agreed to take over from me in the role of Administrator of the Norbert Elias Foundation’s blog.

That means that submissions to the blog will now be routed automatically to Jason.

And, if you want to have announcements or comments posted on the blog, please email them directly to Jason at: Jason.Hughes@le.ac.uk.

Stephen Mennell

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